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5 Dishes That Will Make You Fall in Love With Peruvian Food

When I decided to spend some time in South America I went with my gut (literally) and chose the country that seemed to have the most positive food reviews: Peru. I am happy to say that Peruvian food did not disappoint — I ended up staying in that glorious, delicious country for six months. If you want unique travel in Peru or are simply looking for new dishes to spice up your diet then read on and check out my favourite Peruvian food.

 

peruvian food, peru, unique travel, cuy, guinea pig

By Dtarazona (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Cuy

It’s not everyday you get the opportunity to eat what is commonly considered a household pet – and why would you want to? But, when you’re in Peru you have to keep an open-mind. A dish steeped in history and culture, cuy is what the Peruvians call guinea pig. These little critters are usually served whole (face and all) after being either roasted or deep-fried. The taste is a bit like rabbit and nothing like chicken – so ignore anyone who tells you that. I’m not going to guarantee that you will love cuy, but if you are in Peru and you want to go on a unique travel adventure, it is a good place to start.

Peruvian food, peru, unique travel, lomo saltado

(Photo: Flickr Gary Stevens)

 

Lomo Saltado

This dish very quickly became a staple in my life while I lived in Peru. I used to eat lunch every day at the San Blas market in Cusco because I could get a big plate of lomo saltado for $1.50. The king of Peruvian food, lomo saltado consists of sautéed beef, tomato and onion served with rice and chips. Rice and chips might seem like a weird combo – we would normally just choose one, right? Well the double – even triple carb thing – is pretty common in Peru. You will get used to it, and even grow to love it, in no time. Here’s a recipe in case you fancy making lomo saltado yourself.

Peruvian food, peru, alpaca steak, unique travel

(Photo: Flickr David Berkowitz)

Alpaca Steak

I’m never one to turn down trying some exotic dish you wouldn’t be able to find at home. So when I heard that alpaca steak was a popular Peruvian dish, I rushed out to go and find one. Delightfully low in cholesterol and higher in protein and iron than its cow-based cousin, alpaca steak is basically a super-meat. And, it tastes really good. It is slightly milder than beef, but otherwise you would have a hard time distinguishing the two. As far as Peruvian food goes, the alpaca steak is definitely one of the healthier dishes available.

Peruvian food, peru, ceviche, unique travel

(Photo: Flickr Magnus Bråth)

Ceviche

Some people are wary about eating raw fish but when it comes to eating ceviche it is well worth throwing caution to the wind and tucking in. Obviously be careful if you’re eating ceviche from a tub on the side of the road – stick to restaurants if you can. The same goes for all Peruvian food actually. Ceviche is chunks of raw fish and seafood that has been marinated in lime juice, raw onion, and chilli. You can get ceviche all over Latin America but it is a well-known fact that Peruvian ceviche is the best. Served with sweet potato, Cusco corn and crunchy maize nibbles, the combination of the flavours and textures is utter perfection. If the acidic leche de tigre sauce becomes too much, you can cool your mouth down with a bite of sweet potato. Similarly, if the soft fish leaves you craving something crunchy then the maize nibbles will sort you out. Want to try making it for yourself? Try this recipe.

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By Rosa Virginia Colmenares from Santiago, Chile (Anticuchos) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Anticuchos
Have you ever eaten heart on a stick? No? Peru offers a chance to change that. Anticuchos are probably the most popular street food you will find in Peru and they are much more delicious than the description “heart on a stick” makes them sound. A better image to paint would be succulent chunks of marinated beef heart on a skewer. Head to any street corner and you have a good chance of finding a Peruvian mama with a little barbecue and a stack of anticuchos ready to be grilled up for you. If you’re lucky, she might even spear a potato onto the end of the skewer. Check out this website for info on where to find great anticuchos in Lima.  

Written by

JJ Fox adopted the digital nomad life after realizing that the corporate London life wasn’t for her. Since then she has been traveling the word and eating every weird and wonderful dish that crosses her path. She has lived in the UK, France, Peru and Chile and has over 40 countries under her belt to date. She also has an unhealthy obsession with elephants, which she fuels by collecting elephant memorabilia whenever she can.